Engaged Versus Disengaged Organizations

Engaged Versus Disengaged Organizations

Employee Engagement Surveys are great in measuring engaged versus disengaged organizations.

They serve as a gauge for not only identifying current levels of engagement, but also in predicting future issues, such as potential attrition, quality issues, and even profitability concerns. They help us identify best practices, and share these with other parts of the organization. In short, they serve as an excellent real-time check on the health of the culture within the organization.

But, aside from looking at survey results, how can we tell whether or not we have an engaged organization?

Taken from our latest book, MAGIC: Five Keys to Unlock the Power of Employee Engagement, we’ve put together a short list of what to expect in an engaged organization versus one that is disengaged:

Engaged Organization Disengaged Organization
Employees take primary responsibility for their own engagement. Employees leave engagement up to the organization.
Employees are the strongest advocates for their company and their brand; our research shows that in these companies, more than 80 percent feel that an insult to the company is also a personal insult. Employees don’t care about the organization, and talk negatively about their jobs and superiors.
Employees remain committed, even during hard times. During difficult times, employees complain, blame, shirk duties, or leave (psychologically or physically).
Employees eagerly bring quality and safety issues to management’s attention. Employees have little commitment to safety or quality, beyond required compliance.
Employees create energy in others that can be felt–it’s almost palpable. Employees drain energy from others. The organization feels lethargic.
There is appreciation, gratitude, and willingness to contribute. Employees feel entitled. They become resentful when they don’t receive what they feel entitled to.
Employees engage customers, vendors, and each other. Employees are apathetic.
Employees can engage whether at the office, telecommuting, or traveling. Employees won’t put forth discretionary effort away from the supervision of bosses.
Collaboration is active and enthusiastic. Sabotage is occurring, whether actively or passively.
There is a “we” mentality. There is a “me” mentality.
The organization is self-led, empowered, and determined. The organization is over-managed and under-led.
Feelings of engagement and love for the job are genuine. Enthusiasm for the job is blatantly artificial.

 

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